Friday, March 21, 2008

Adam Smith worship assorted

Adam Smith quote of the day;

In great empires the people who live in the capital, and in the provinces remote from the scene of action, feel, many of them, scarce any inconveniency from the war; but enjoy, at their ease, the amusement of reading in the newspapers the exploits of their own fleets and armies. To them this amusement compensates the small difference between the taxes which they pay on account of the war, and those which they had been accustomed to pay in time of peace. They are commonly dissatisfied with the return of peace, which puts an end to their amusement, and to a thousand visionary hopes of conquest and national glory from a longer continuance of the war.

via Glenn Greenwald

Adam Smith on Laptops in the Classroom;
No discipline is ever requisite to force attendance upon lectures which are really worth the attending, as is well known wherever any such lectures are given. Force and restraint may, no doubt, be in some degree requisite in order to oblige children, or very young boys, to attend to those parts of education which it is thought necessary for them to acquire during that early period of life; but after twelve or thirteen years of age, provided the master does his duty, force or restraint can scarce ever be necessary to carry on any part of education.

Adam Smith and Tourettes Syndrome

Adam Smith and the Search for an Ideal Tax System

Adam Smith On Religious Institutions

Was Adam Smith Wrong About the Invisible Hand?

Measuring Adam Smith's sympathy

Adam Smith on Relative Poverty

"The Many Faces of Adam Smith"

Adam Smith on trade protection as rent seeking

Adam Smith on Overconfidence;
The over-weening conceit which the greater part of men have of their own abilities, is an ancient evil remarked by the philosophers and moralists of all ages. Their absurd presumption in their own good fortune, has been less taken notice of. It is, however, if possible, still more universal. There is no man living who, when in tolerable health and spirits, has not some share of it. The chance of gain is by every man more or less over-valued, and the chance of loss is by most men under-valued, and by scarce any man, who is in tolerable health and spirits, valued more than it is worth. ...

The contempt of risk and the presumptuous hope of success, are in no period of life more active than at the age at which young people chuse their professions. How little the fear of misfortune is then capable of balancing the hope of good luck, appears still more evidently in the readiness of the common people to enlist as soldiers, or to go to sea, than in the eagerness of those of better fashion to enter into what are called the liberal professions.

Adam Smith Had Nothing to Say on CSR

Adam Smith & Sustainable Agriculture

Adam Smith's Pin Factory

Adam Smith and Self-Command

Darth Vader and Adam Smith: Similar philosophies on political economy?

Adam Smith & Behavioral Economics

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